Copyright Information and Issues

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The following sites provide good information about copyright issues.

  • BitLaw: a Resource on Technology Law

    "BitLaw is a comprehensive Internet resource on technology law, containing over 1,800 pages on patent, copyright, trademark, and Internet legal issues. BitLaw was created by Daniel A. Tysver, a partner with the intellectual property law firm of Beck & Tysver."

  • Copyright Crash Course

    Excellent site on copyright created at the University of Texas. Although it is written specifically for UT employees, it is an excellent resource for information on copyright.

  • Copyright Resources Online

    An index site of copyright sources, divided into two lists, one pertaining to copyright issues in university settings, the other to copyright issues in non-university settings. There are annotated and unannotated lists for both.

  • The Copyright Website

    Excellent site with clear examples from a variety of media. Also includes sections on the "Basics" and "News" on copyright issues.

  • © Primer (CIP - Center for Intellectual Property and Copyright, University of Maryland University College)

    "The © Primer is an introduction to issues concerning copyright ownership and use of information. The interactive tutorial overviews the underlying principles behind copyright in the United States, outlines the requirements for copyright protection as well as discusses the parameters of use and access of copyrighted material. The © Primer is intended to introduce both creators and users of information to the nuts and bolts of copyright law. Consisting of twenty-one questions and answers, the © Primer includes illustrative scenarios and resources for further information and study."

  • CyberTimes Coverage of Copyright Issues

    New York Times news stories about copyright. Requires registration, but it is a free service. (NOTE: requires free registration.)

  • DigitalConsumer.org

    "This group organized in response to the recording industry's growing use of encryption and copyright law changes to prevent any copying (including fair use copying) of music CDs (compact discs). They are "advocating a Consumer Technology Bill of Rights that will positively assert a consumer's rights to fair use." The Web site provides background material on the law, proposed legislation, and what consumers can do about it." (Reviewed by Martha Gifford, LII Editor/Librarian at Librarians' Index to the Internet for New This Week May 30, 2002 at Librarians' Index to the Internet)

  • Intellectual Property, Copyright and Fair Use Resources

    Excellent list of links to resources on intellectual property law.

  • Regent's Guide to Understanding Copyright and Educational Fair Use

    This comprehensive guide, from the University System of Georgia, is presented in two sections. The first gives principles of fair use, and the second part provides illustrations of how to apply the standards of fair use. Categories listed include printed material, audio/visual material, coursepacks, posting documents to the Web, and much more.

  • Stanford University Libraries: Copyright & Fair Use

    An index site to resources on copyright and fair use, including a link to a resource on "Multimedia and Fair Use."

  • The TEACH Toolkit: An Online Resource for Understanding Copyright and Distance Education

    "The Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act (TEACH Act) "updates copyright law pertaining to transmissions of performances and displays of copyrighted materials. Such transmissions are critical to current higher education distance education efforts, including online courses." This site from North Carolina State University Libraries features a summary and the text of TEACH and information on implementation, best practices, and fair use. Also includes compliance checklists, a permissions guide, and copyright tutorials." (Reviewed by Margaret Myhre for the Librarians' Index to the Internet: NEW THIS WEEK for September 25, 2003)

  • Trademark and Other Intellectual Property Resource Guide

    "The term intellectual property refers to a number of unique kinds of creations of the mind for which a group of exclusive rights is recognized. Intellectual property law works in the following way. Owners are given specific, exclusive rights to a host of intangible assets, which can be artistic, literary, or musical works, inventions, discoveries, designs, symbols, words, or even phrases. A few examples of common kinds of intellectual property are trademarks, copyrights, industrial design rights, patents, and trade secrets. Intellectual property rights are important since they protect the right of the owners of intellectual property to earn money from the created property, thus stimulating others to come up with intellectual property of their own."









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