Weathering and Mass Wasting Partial Test Bank
  • The breakup of existing surface and near surface material is: (a) erosion; (b) mass wasting; (c) weathering; (d) foliation; (e) lithification.
  • The degradation of the earth's surface by natural processes involving agents is BEST called: (a) mass wasting; (b) weathering; (c) erosion; (d) carbonation; (e) exfoliation.
  • The breaking of rocks by alternate freezing and thawing of water in cracks is: (a) mass wasting; (b) plant wedging; (c) frost wedging; (d) hydration; (e) exfoliation.
  • An example of mechanical weathering is: (a) frost wedging; (b) hydration; (c) carbonation; (d) oxidation; (e) ALL of these.
  • The breaking of rocks by the growth of roots in cracks is: (a) mass wasting; (b) plant wedging; (c) frost wedging; (d) hydration; (e) exfoliation.
  • The breaking of rocks by alternate freezing and thawing of water in cracks is: (a) mass wasting; (b) plant wedging; (c) frost wedging; (d) hydration; (e) exfoliation.
  • The category of weathering involving disintegration or fragmentation of the rock is: (a) chemical; (b) mechanical; (c) clastic; (d) erosion; (e) mass wasting.
  • The type of weathering BEST associated with limestone is: (a) carbonation; (b) frost wedging; (c) oxidation; (d) hydration; (e) exfoliation.
  • The category of weathering involving decomposition or alteration of the rock is: (a) chemical; (b) mechanical; (c) clastic; (d) erosion; (e) mass wasting.
  • The peeling of rock layers like an onion is: (a) carbonation; (b) exfoliation; (c) hydration; (d) solifluction; (e) mass wasting.
  • The down slope movement of material under the influence of gravity is: (a) mass wasting; (b) weathering; (c) carbonation; (d) hydration; (e) oxidation.
  • The angle which is the steepest angle that can be assumed by loose fragments on a slope is the angle of: (a) slip; (b) scarp; (c) repose; (d) creep; (e) dip.
  • A type of creep distinctive to areas of permafrost is: (a) hydration; (b) solifluction; (c) exfoliation; (d) avalanche; (e) carbonation.
  • The slow down slope transfer of loose rock and soil by the pull of gravity is: (a) creep; (b) landslide; (c) mudflow; (d) talus; (e) slump.
  • The sloping or cone-shaped pile of loose material at the base of a cliff is: (a) ash; (b) talus; (c) cinder; (d) sima; (e) conglomerate.
  • The fast down slope movement of loose rocks and soil mixed with much water by the pull of gravity is: (a) creep; (b) landslide; (c) mudflow; (d) talus; (e) slump.
  • A slow movement of soil downslope under the pull of gravity known to cause retaining walls to topple is a(n): (a) mudflow; (b) avalanche; (c) creep ; (d) slump; (e) landslide.
  • The fast down slope movement of a large mass of rock and soil under the pull of gravity is a(n): (a) creep; (b) landslide; (c) mudflow; (d) talus; (e) exfoliation.
  • Tilted telephone poles would MOST likely result from: (a) slump; (b) landslide; (c) creep; (d) mudflow; (e) avalanche.
  • Of the following, the most resistant to weathering is: (a) coal; (b) limestone; (c) shale; (d) quartz; (e) feldspar.
  • Of the following, the most resistant rock in a humid climate is: (a) limestone; (b) sandstone; (c) shale; (d) coal; (e) marble.


     Go to the Glossary of Landform Terms.


     Go to the Weathering and Mass Wasting Lecture Notes.

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